constant vigilance

awarenessMy boss is always using the term “constant vigilance” to remind us to keep our eyes out for issues that would cause us to get a tag in a state survey.  Once a year, the nursing home must undergo a state survey, where a team of surveyors come into the facility and check on all our systems.  It is a stressful time, but if we always do our jobs in accordance with the rules, then we know there will be no worries when survey comes.  Constant vigilance is needed year round to ensure that the needs of our residents are being met and that we are operating under proper procedure.  It is also needed in our personal lives to ensure that we are making choices in accordance with our values and what we want for our future.

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a Martha Stewart story

Last night, I hosted a thank-you party for my co-workers who are part of a fundraising team for the Walk to End Alzheimer’s.  I work with a great bunch of people who put in a great deal of time and energy to raise money for this important cause.  Though I am considered the team leader, I never feel like I’m doing anything alone.  People will come up and congratulate me on doing well at our many events, but the thanks really goes to everyone, some who prefer to remain behind the scenes.  They are the people who provide ideas, supplies, baked goods, and raffle items that make the fundraiser a success.  I am only the face on the front.  Tonight will be a night for them to relax, have something to eat, and meet the former Martha Stewart.

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who’s driving your bus?

We use a lot of bus metaphors where I work.  Who’s riding the bus?  Who’s under the bus?  Who had to take the bus because they wore the wrong shoes to the walk?  (That was the funniest one, but a long story.)  The one I want to talk about today is who’s driving the bus?  I pose that question as a metaphor for asking yourself about who makes the choices that drive your actions.

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d.r.a.m.a.

The lights come on, the curtains go up, the actors take the stage, and the drama begins.  No, this is not a theater production; it is the place where you work.  My on the job experience has shown me that the workplace can hold more dramatic productions than a popular theater.  They are breeding grounds for drama in that there is a large cast of characters who all bring different aspects of themselves and their lives into one relatively small environment.  How could it not bring about occasional clashes of personality, differences of opinion, pettiness, and general annoyances?  The solution to all the drama lies somewhere in the use of boundaries, personal integrity, and values.

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